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Managing Oneself


Throughout history, people had little need to manage their careers--they were born into their station in life or, in the recent past, they relied on their companies to chart their career paths. But times have drastically changed. Today, we must all learn to manage ourselves. What does that mean? According to Peter Drucker, it means we have to learn to develop ourselves. We have to place ourselves where we can make the greatest contribution to our organizations and communities. And we have to stay mentally alert and engaged during a 50-year working life, which means knowing how and when to change the work that we do. It may seem obvious that people achieve results by doing what they are good at and by working in ways that fit their abilities. But, Drucker says, very few people actually know--let alone take advantage of--their unique strengths. He challenges each of us to ask ourselves fundamental questions: What are my strengths? How do I perform? What are my values? Where do I belong? What should my contribution be? Don't try to change yourself, cautions Drucker. Instead, concentrate on improving the skills you have and accepting assignments that are tailored to your individual way of working. If you do that, you can transform yourself from an ordinary worker into an outstanding performer. Successful careers today are not planned out in advance. They develop when people are prepared for opportunities because they have asked themselves those questions, and they have rigorously assessed their unique characteristics. This article challenges readers to take responsibility for managing their futures, both in and out of the office.




Managing Oneself


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Purpose: With the growing attention in pediatric rehabilitation services for supporting self-management, the need increases for more shared understanding of the concept. The aim of this study was to explore parent activation, associated factors of- and underlying perceptions on parental self-management of parents of children with chronic conditions.Materials and methods: Using a mixed-methods strategy, first variations in self-management behaviors, motivation and perceived autonomy support were assessed with a cross-sectional survey among parents of children with chronic conditions (N = 239). Statistical analysis involved descriptive statistics and univariate analysis of variance. The survey was followed by 18 in-depth interviews with parents. Thematic analysis was used to recognize relevant topics in the qualitative data.Results: In the survey most parents reported being active self-managers. Nevertheless, only one third persisted in self-management when under stress. Autonomous motivation was strongly associated with parental self-management. In the interviews, parents mentioned attuning with professionals and finding balance as important aspects of self-management. To facilitate self-management, professionals were expected to have expert knowledge, be engaged and empathic.Conclusion: From the perspective of parents, self-management should be viewed as a collaborative effort in which they are supported by professionals, rather than having to manage it "by themselves".Implications for rehabilitationTo facilitate self-management, parents expect professionals to have expert knowledge and additionally show interpersonal competences as openness, engagement and empathy.Motivating parents may facilitate their level of self-management regarding the care for their child with a chronic disorder.Good communication and collaboration with professionals appear to be key aspects of parental self-management.Parents expect pediatric rehabilitation teams to tune their services to the needs, desires and expectations of parents to support them in "self-managing" the care for their child.


It used to be that organizations outlived workers. Now the opposite is true, workers outlive organizations, and they are mobile. The need to manage oneself is therefore creating a revolution in human affairs.


After 20 years of doing very much the same kind of work, people are very good at their jobs. But they are not learning or contributing or deriving challenge and satisfaction from the job. And yet they are still likely to face another 20 if not 25 years of work. That is why managing oneself increasingly leads one to begin a second career.


We live in an age of unprecedented opportunity: with ambition, drive, and talent, you can rise to the top of your chosen profession regardless of where you started out. But with opportunity comes responsibility. Companies today aren't managing their knowledge workers careers. Instead, you must be your own chief executive officer. That means it's up to you to carve out your place in the world and know when to change course. And it's up to you to keep yourself engaged and productive during a career that may span some 50 years. In Managing Oneself, Peter Drucker explains how to do it. The keys: Cultivate a deep understanding of yourself by identifying your most valuable strengths and most dangerous weaknesses; Articulate how you learn and work with others and what your most deeply held values are; and Describe the type of work environment where you can make the greatest contribution. Only when you operate with a combination of your strengths and self-knowledge can you achieve true and lasting excellence. Managing Oneself identifies the probing questions you need to ask to gain the insights essential for taking charge of your career. Peter Drucker was a writer, teacher, and consultant. His 34 books have been published in more than 70 languages. He founded the Peter F. Drucker Foundation for Nonprofit Management, and counseled 13 governments, public services institutions, and major corporations. 041b061a72


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